Tag Archives: Covid-19

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The Canadian Red Cross, working in partnership with Health Canada and provincial and territorial authorities, is offering the Stop the Spread and Stay Safe program to help keep community organizations, their personnel, and the people they serve safe. 

Stop the Spread and Stay Safe at Home: FREE take-home rapid antigen tests and masks for community organizations’ personnel and the people they serve.

TLE will have take-home Antigen tests and KN-95 masks available for students, volunteers, teachers and staff. Please reserve or make your request:

  • call 450-688-2933 ext. 3126
  • email us: TLEliteracy@yahoo.ca
  • or see Enza in room 215: Monday – Thursday between 8:30 and 2:30 PM. 

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The World Health Organization officially declared COVID-19 a pandemic.

Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) updates: Canada 

Up-to-date information in areas of Canada


Canadian Government



Quebec Government



Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering


Educaloi

Your starting point for legal information in plain language


CNESST

The CNESST phone number is 1 844 838-0808



Vaccine Information for COVID-19

A look at the different vaccines that were under development:


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Every Action Counts

Bell Let’s Talk Day is January 28, 2021 | version française

Now more than ever, every action counts. On Bell Let’s Talk Day, Bell will donate more towards mental health initiatives in Canada by contributing 5¢ for every applicable text, call, tweet or TikTok video using #BellLetsTalk, social media video view and use of our Facebook frame or Snapchat filter.

Toolkit

Want to join in to help create positive change, but don’t know how? It’s all about having the right tools to join the conversation and help create positive change. The Bell Let’s Talk Toolkit consists of simple everyday tools that can be used to take action to support mental health, including a conversation guide, workplace activities and social media images.

To help you spread the word about mental health, we’ve created a toolkit that includes a conversation guide and helpful templates for use in schools, communities, and workplaces.

Bell Let’s Talk Toolkit

Resources

Not sure where to go to find help or who to turn to? Consulting with your healthcare provider or another trusted professional is always a great start. You can also refer to our list of organizations with helpful resources.

If you are looking for online and other resources available to support and help manage your mental health through the COVID-19 situation, there are resources:

Covid-19 Resources

What is Bell Let’s Talk?

Bell Let’s Talk is a multi-year charitable program dedicated to the promotion and support of mental health across Canada. Since 2010, Bell has committed more than $100 million to support a wide range of mental health organizations, large and small, from coast to coast focusing on anti-stigma, care and access, workplace mental health and research.

Stay up-to-date

Year after year, Bell Let’s Talk gets the nation buzzing and taking action to help create positive change for mental health. Stay up-to-date on everything Bell Let’s Talk with the latest articles, media releases and videos.

Bell Let’s Talk News and Videos

A LEARNING EXCHANGE / CDC VIMONT partner event

 


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From World Health Organization:

1. Hands:

Frequent washing with soap and water, or preferably with an alcohol-based hand solution, kills viruses that may be on your hands. It is simple, but it is very important.

2.Elbows:

Cover your nose and mouth with a bent elbow or tissue when you sneeze or cough. Dispose of tissue immediately and wash your hands.

Droplets spread the coronavirus. By following respiratory hygiene, you protect the people around you from contracting viruses, such as cold, flu and coronavirus. 

3.Face:

Avoid touching your face, particularly your eyes, nose or mouth to prevent the virus from entering your body. Hands touch too many surfaces and can quickly pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus.

4.Distance:

In terms of social interaction, take a step back. Stay at least one metre distance from others.

By maintaining such social distancing, you are helping to avoid breathing in any droplets from someone who sneezes or coughs in close proximity. 

5.Feel – know your symptoms:

If you feel unwell, stay home. Please follow all instructions provided by your local health authorities. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. 

Keep informed as local health authorities provide the latest information on the situation in your area. Please follow their specific instructions, and call in advance to allow them to direct you to the appropriate local health facility. This serves to protect you and to help prevent the spread of virus and other infections. 

For more information, please consult @WHO and follow the latest information online


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from Dictionary.com by John Kelly, Senior Research Editor at Dictionary.com

During public health emergencies, like the outbreak of the coronavirus, it’s essential to stay informed. But a lot of that information, when it’s not misleading, can be overwhelming and confusing—down to the very words we use to talk about a crisis.

What’s COVID-19? Is that the same thing as coronavirus? Is the disease an epidemic or pandemic? And what’s the difference between quarantine and isolation?

In everyday conversations, people sometimes use quarantine and isolation interchangeably to refer to separating people in various ways due to the spread of a disease. But for doctors, public health officials, and other professionals, there is an important distinction between quarantine and isolation.

More From Dictionary.com: Is The Coronavirus A Plague?

Let’s break these words down.

What does quarantine mean?

In general, a quarantine is “a strict isolation imposed to prevent the spread of disease.” We know what you might be thinking: so, a quarantine is … just an isolation? Not exactly.

As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains, the practice of a quarantine specifically involves:

… the separation of a person or group of people reasonably believed to have been exposed to a communicable disease but not yet symptomatic, from others who have not been so exposed, to prevent the possible spread of the communicable disease.

Read full article here


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